Archive for the ‘cyber security’ Category

“This might be the first government IT project ever that came in under initial cost estimates. Perhaps the reason is that the states did not want to implement REAL-ID in 2005, so they overstated the costs.


As to fraud reduction — I’m not so sure. As the difficulty of getting a fraudulent ID increases, so does its value. I think we’ll have to wait a while longer and see how criminals adapt.”   Bruce Schneier, Security technology expert 

:::MORE HERE::: 

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Transcript of DHS Secretary Napolitano’s speech at George Washington University 

Idaho Nullification Effort Delayed, but Not Stopped


Less than 1,000 public comments logged for national online ID proposal NSTIC

[As released from Anti-National ID Coalition]

The timeframe for public input on an online national identity system expired Monday with less than 1,000 comments on the National Strategy for Trusted Identity in Cyberspace or NSTIC. The White House sought public input during a 3 week timeframe on a high concept strategy to increase cyber security. The public comment was hosted online and moderated under the seal of the Department of Homeland Security.

NSTIC would create a new national identity “ecosystem” for online users in America. Since that time, coalitions are forming and organizing around the dispensation of public interest in the program in an effort to ask the White House and Congress for more time to evaluate the impact of the program.

“There’s a lot to consider with this program. It’s scope, cost and effects on the public are largely unknowns. We need more time to gauge the impact of how the program will affect privacy and identity,” said Sheila Dean, an organizer for the anti-national ID coalition.

Privacy and identity coalitions, like the anti-national ID coalition, are working to increase dialogue. Each of their organizations will be a part of an open letter to the White House about the new proposal for an online identity system, requesting an additional 90 days to evaluate the program. Details about the technical structure and commercial contractors were difficult to pin down from a 36 page conceptual schematic issued under the DHS agency.

There was clear intent from the proposal to sell the adoption of the strategy to businesses and to encourage successive adoption by consumers. Little concrete or detailed information was available about costs, impacts to public safety, privacy and civil liberty and other ranges of concerns applied to public efficacy on the proposal’s application.

With so many unknowns, more and more questions are turning up among advocates and legal professionals who won’t be able to take a position on the national identity program without more information becoming available.

Here is second life for news that matters:

GOOD NEWS! DC judge suspends sentence for Hart building dissent

“The biggest concern is that the government not be put in the middle of private networks so that it monitors private communications for cybersecurity purposes,” said Gregory Nojeim, senior director at the Center for Democracy andTechnology.”    

The Senate bill on Cyber Security passes one chamber and the TSA could not wait for an option to block “controversial opinion” for their employees.

DIY GOVERNMENT: HOST A FOIA PARTY!

TX Red light camera backlash

Online medical records raise privacy concerns

WSJ: United States recipe for population control?
Secure the borders, count the people, declare martial law.”



BTC – What is a national identification number (NIN)?  Why would it be useful or what purpose would it serve? Who gets a number?  How would it affect public life?

Enumerated identity and its uses are typically to manage populaces en masse.

From Wikipedia:

A national identification number or National Identity Card number is used by the governments of many countries as a means of tracking their citizenspermanent residents, and temporary residents for the purposes of work, taxation, government benefitshealth care, and other governmentally-related functions. Sometimes, the number will appear on an identity card issued by a country.

The ways in which such a system is implemented is dependent on the country, but in most cases, a citizen is issued a number at birth or when they reach a legal age (typically the age of 18). Non-citizens are issued such numbers when they enter the country.

Many countries issued such numbers ostensibly for a singular purpose, but over time, they become a de facto national identification number. For example, the United States originally developed its Social Security Number system as a means of disbursing Social Security benefits. However, due to functionality creep, the number has become utilized for other purposes to the point where it is almost essential to have one in order to, among other things, open a bank account, obtain acredit card, or drive a car.  

As technology advances there are always more systems to categorize persons based on wants, needs, likes, and dislikes.  Information is useful for many objectives; but in the context of power it can be abused.  Information (or intelligence) abuses may range from common blackmail to surveillance abuse.  Information about an individual can be conveniently reduced to an enumerated identity. This gives data value and longevity because it may prove something about us. However, it may be private information or information we do not want known at large.

The White House is giving the American public roughly 3 weeks to examine the National Strategy for Trusted Identity in Cyberspace or NSTIC, an new system which would produce a number for every American online user.  The American public bears the burden of what happens to their identity property online.  For example, if you are checking on a malady from Bora Bora, Big Government Computers could feasibly track or capture that information and trace it back to you.  Why would they even care?

Well… it’s not personal at first.  As we have discovered over the last several years, providing surveillance technology services is an enormous corporate industry between the public and private sectors.   There is an economic incentive to track us. Businesses will pay for analysis of who you are and why you will or won’t buy their stuff.  Government intelligence agencies hire contractors who can get the same information for their purposes. Google has made a killing from selling search generated information which has the ability to identify any user straight down to their IP addresses.  

We have to be careful with programs like NSTIC.  Other programs like Real ID, the PASS Act and the proposed BELIEVE worker cards have been recognized as nefarious by the American public.  The notion of a deeper, more prolific, voluntary induction into a national identity system via the operability of a social network (akin to joining up with Facebook) might be uneasy prospect for citizens.  With current odds stacked up against privacy and civil liberty,  I can’t say with much confidence the US government is a friend worth adding to an individual social network.  
If Federal powers want to: table the more rediculous Executive Orders, stop using the NSA States Secrets line of rhetoric to hide all the dead bodies, dump the FISA warrantless wiretapping entitlements, remove the TSA naked body scanners from airports, repeal existing compromising national identity systems creeping up annually, stop suppressing journalists and arresting whistleblowers THEN citizens might naturally develop more confidence.  
This track record does not inspire trust in validating an ask for pervasive friendship from those who know better.
The point is to examine NSTIC with both eyes open for what it actually is, could be and may be in the future because it has possibilities with a price.  This may be your only chance to opt out of automatic subscription to an online service.  

“Folks, should have the Bruce Schneier interview up tonight or Sunday night about Jo-Jo The Clown’s Interwebz act.  If Lieberman had feathers attached, he could be sold as a pet.”  – AntiWar.com’s Angela Keaton 

BTC- “LOS LIIIINKS!”

Border: ‘Project Roadrunner’ to Recognize, Track License Plates

Supreme Court Rules for Petition Disclosure

DHS IG wants US CERT enforcement power, doesn’t say how

Section 706 worse than Lieberman bill, says Senate Committee

2 experts resign from WHO swine flu review panel

View Draft Strategy Here… “Identity Ecosystem” starts on pg. 12


BTC – It’s called National Strategy for Trusted Identities in Cyberspace or NSTIC.  It is a policy “blueprint” for the incorporation of a national online identity number.  NSTIC will be available for public evaluation Friday via WhiteHouse.gov.  Public comments concerning the new centralized identity number will be taken for 3 weeks.  Interaction is expected to take place online using Open Government crowdsourcing tools from IdeaScale.

According to Electronic Frontier Foundation identity counsel, Lee Tien, concerning the number, “[It’s] very much an issue in the US as part of the Cyber Security effort.”

White House considerations of a comprehensive identity number system for internet users became more transparent in public discussions over Cyber Security with Civil Liberty and National Security staffer, Tim Edgar last week in San Jose, Calif during the CFP 2010 conference.

International concerns over right of dissent and current uses of a nationalized internet identity number were raised by the British Columbia Freedom of Information and Privacy Association and UK identity and privacy advocates, NO2ID.   Amid concerns were that integrating every users online data into one hub could destroy a persons identity if it were hacked, stolen or compromised in a way where identity was mistaken or misappropriated.   It was also communicated that a priority of newly elected coalition government was to repeal all current motions towards centralizing identity data and consolidating public records of the individual into one card.

The United Kingdom is not the only country in the world which could mandate an online identity number registry.  Egypt  is working to try a nationalized online payment system which requires a national identity number.

BTC – There really is no shortage of great information available on the net.  We get so much great content which used to get dumped into our Facebook feeds.  For now, we are using our twitter feed as our fast track to informing those who would best served by what should be regular decent briefing for readers.

The point of REDUX is to get a short list of relevant news which would ordinarily escape, but gets a second chance here on BeatTheChip.org.  Obviously we failed our own self-imposed editorial goal of posting 3 original pieces a day.  It doesn’t mean we aren’t watching the blogs to catch the news and brilliant editorials worth mentioning.   The sheer volume and scope can be overwhelming.  With REDUX it’s possible to re-post direct links to the most relevant news of the day without drowning in the constant distractions of social network news trolling.

Here’s the second life for news that matters:

Hackers aren’t the only threat to privacy 

Websites arbit for ability to determine criminality via terms of service

DARPA taking heat for exaggerated “Cyber war” range

APD-TX training for forced blood withdrawls on mentally ill TDCJ inmates

Are Napolitano’s Mass Spying Powers a Greater Threat to Civil Liberties than Bush?

http://media.theonion.com/flash/video/onn_player.swf
Google Opt Out Feature Lets Users Protect Privacy By Moving To Remote Village

TSA reaches out to Identity Project 

FOIA UPDATE – EPIC forces disclosure of report on Obama Passport Breach 

Current List of Airports with Naked Body Scanners