Archive for the ‘data brokerage’ Category

BTC – IBM is that nasty guy at the Info Bar who slips something into your beverage while you are distracted and then takes full advantage before you come to.  Guys like that believe, inherently, you want your non-consensual compromise as badly as they do.

“It [BIG DATA] will change our existing notions of privacy. A surveillance society is not only inevitable, it’s worse. It’s irresistible,” said Jeff Jonas, a distinguished engineer with IBM. Jonas spoke to a packed house of several hundred people Wednesday at the Structure Big Data 2011 conference here.

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How predictable!  IBM, Verichip wundersponsor, can’t help but love systemic numerical processing of people’s information for cash!  Ahem … excepting the deep privacy argument that information surveillance doesn’t really happen- or even start- with bonafide informed consent, simply distracted consent.  Between TIME’s coverage of the great data heist of 2011 and the Wall Street Journal’s “What They Know” columns; Washington has been successfully cornered on the massive problem of unaccountable data brokerages and the information surveillance of millions of people.

Let’s not forget what we are up against; an entire unchecked industry who -for lack of limits- has grown not only entitled, by years of unchecked precedent, but also super-rich.   A simple protest in NYC is not fixing this…

Here is second life for news that matters.

WHAT THEY KNOW @alleyinsider: Color isn’t about photo sharing. It’s about data mining. Founder Bill Nguyen explains. http://read.bi/f3WU6k

Browser Beware: Washington Weighs Online Consumer Privacy

Data Mining: How Companies Now Know Everything About You

Big Data to revolutionize Healthcare according to ONC 

Europe and U.S. converging on Internet privacy

Are 95% of People Investigated Under New FBI Guidelines Innocent, but Entered into Database?

Company says it has ‘zero tolerance’ for data brokers c/o PCR News

Facebook said that a “data broker” had paid Facebook app developers for user identification numbers and that as a result the company had suspended a number of developers.

Given that the user identification numbers (UIDs) were not considered to be private and that merely knowing a UID does not bestow anyone the ability to access private data, the hard line taken by the social networking behemoth is as much a statement of intent to tackle the firm’s tarnished reputation when it comes to privacy concerns.

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