Archive for the ‘DNA’ Category




KXAN reports: State of Texas Bartering Baby Blood Samples, Hides DNA Database Agenda

BTC – Involuntary DNA retentions have been found to be an international violation of Human Rights. Tell that to all your globalist friends at the United Nations.

c/o Privacy International

EUROPEAN COURT OF HUMAN RIGHTS
4.12.2008
Press release issued by the Registrar
GRAND CHAMBER JUDGMENT
S. AND MARPER v. THE UNITED KINGDOM
The European Court of Human Rights has today delivered at a public hearing its Grand Chamber judgment1 in the case of S. and Marper v. the United Kingdom (application nos. 30562/04 and 30566/04).


BTC – Welcome. The TSA is embarking on a body content capture of what’s on your hands. The rest is up to you. If you don’t care – they won’t either. However, just remember you don’t actually have to be a criminal anymore to be treated like one in America. The litmus test for any organic test that arbitrarily collects body samples in a body content capture campaign is a simple question: WHAT ARE YOU GOING TO DO WITH THAT INFORMATION?

Wash your hands before you went to the airport? You may want to. This week, the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) is beginning new, extra security measures at our nation’s airports: hand swabs.

Have you ever had a bag “randomly” selected for supplemental screening after pushing it through the X-ray? In addition to the manual search, agents often swipe your bag with a clean cloth and put the material into a shoebox-sized detector. They’re checking for the residue of bomb-making material — potentially undetectable by eye but sniffable by the robot.

That same residue will stick to your hands if you’re not careful, which is what the TSA is hoping to identify in their random hand swabs. It’s just speculation, but our guess is that the underwear bomber had traces of PETN on his hands, so the TSA now thinks that they can foil plots better by checking those members.

Provided, that is, that they swab the right person’s hands. As with many of the TSA’s initiatives, this new hand-swabbing effort is a random operation, so if the perpetrator gets lucky and doesn’t get swabbed — well, then the problem moves onward.

c/o NO2ID

“ID cards? They’re already dead.” – “Oh no they’re not!”

[BTC – No2ID keeps us from going absolutely crazy with speculation about national ID cards as globalist agenda item.]

One of the dangers once you start winning the battle for public opinion is that people think it’s game over already. Don’t believe it for a minute – the ID scheme is NOT dead. Nor are ContactPoint or e-Borders. There are still a million innocent people on the DNA database, with more being added every week. Comms data, travel info, medical records, car
tracking, vetting and barring, profiling – despite all rumours and spin to the contrary, the database state rolls on.

The next several months are particularly risky. Even more so if people think we’ve already won.

Whitehall is doing what it can to entrench database state programmes and initiatives – making them as difficult as possible for a new government to scrap, roll back or disentangle. It won’t often be as blatant as the latest push to upload millions of people’s medical details onto the NHS Spine (newsletter 137) so we must be more vigilant than ever.

NO2ID has always been about informing yourself and informing others. Campaigning is not just about hitting the headlines, it’s about engaging people where they live. You only have to look at the local groups section of each newsletter to see the phenomenal work that groups are doing – week in, week out helping spread the word, shift attitudes and
build opposition all over the UK.

A huge thank you to everyone who gives so generously of their time and energy, working with a local group. And special thanks to NO2ID’s local and regional coordinators – we couldn’t do it without you.

As 2009 draws to a close, I wish you and your families a peaceful, surveillance-free Christmas – and here’s hoping 2010 will prove to be a good year for privacy and freedom!

Phil Booth
National Coordinator, NO2ID

TODAY ON WAKING UP ORWELL

LISTEN : DNA Captures & the law with Dr. Deborah Peel


DNA’s use in making or breaking criminal justice cases has been instrumental in recent history. However, an equally recent practice is being abused. Patients’ DNA is being collected and stored without their knowlege or consent. Those with questions about their health and their digital privacy should tune in for our interview with Patient Privacy Rights’, Dr. Deborah Peel. Patient Privacy Rights is the nation’s leading health privacy watchdog. Deborah Peel, MD founded Patient Privacy Rights in 2004, now with 10,000 members in every state.

http://www.kxan.com/video/videoplayer.swf?dppversion=3758

“For me and my family,” said Beleno,

“No, you can’t have our DNA.”

c/o KXAN.com

National DNA Database

In 2006 and 2007, then, Senator Obama, filed legislation that would create a national DNA database. The same bill was filed by Sen. Patrick Kennedy in 2008 . The bills required parental consent, but all three died in the Senate.

Study finds support by some parents

Not everyone is opposed to collecting, storing and using DNA from the newborn screening program for later use. A study by the University of Michigan found that when asked for consent, only 24 percent of parents objected to using their newborns blood samples for research. That number jumped to 72 percent of parents who were somewhat or very unwilling when asked if the samples could be used without permission.

Andrea Beleno said she may have consented, if asked. But after seeing how the State of Texas has handled the issue, her mind is made up.

“For me and my family,” said Beleno, “No, you can’t have our DNA.”

So far, more than 8,200 other families have made that same decision to opt out of allowing the state to use their child’s genetic material.

CLG >>UK Independent

Police forces have been arresting people simply to add them to the controversial DNA database as a result of lax rules that have developed with almost no public scrutiny, the Government’s independent DNA watchdog warns today.

The Human Genetics Commission (HGC) also says there is little evidence that the national DNA database, the largest of its kind in the world, is of any use in solving crimes. In its two-year report examining the database, published today, it concludes that allowing police to add anyone arrested to the DNA database damages the assumption of innocence.

The report received testimony from one senior police source, a retired chief superintendent, who said it was “the norm” for officers to arrest someone to obtain their DNA profile.

VIDEO: DNA database crtiticised