Archive for the ‘internet’ Category

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BTC – Popular Science, an online tech magazine, reveals the panoramic divide facing the National Strategies for Identity in Cyberspace proposal which held its first privacy centric workshop at MIT Cambridge Monday and Tuesday of this week.

The Point/Counterpoint column exhibits the polarities in debate discussions reflected in some of the work groups and their findings.

IN FAVOR: We Need a System of Internet IDs by Becky Ferreira
“It’ll save us money and provide secure (yet optional) ways to do our online banking, healthcare, and taxes.”

OPPOSED: Internet IDs Are a Terrible Idea by Bryan Gardiner
“Internet IDs will be ineffective, risky, and won’t address the root of our real problems with online security.”

Summary releases and updates can be found at NSTIC.us and the NIST website. Other workshops and seminars are scheduled Monday, Tuesday of next week and throughout the Summer.

SEE ALSO: NSTIC as a National ID [or How NSTIC is not A National ID] by Aaron Titus

This was a neat comment on CNet’s Privacy Inc. following a story about Marsha Blackburn’s duality on net regulation c/o Mickey White.

“Why does Marsha Want Congress to Regulate the Internet? Why not just say NO FEDERAL branch (the FCC and congress and the federal courts included) has any authority to decide or rule on any aspect concerning the Internet? 

BUT Marsha Blackburn did Vote FOR: Patriot Act Reauthorization, Electronic Surveillance, Funding the REAL ID Act (National ID), Foreign Intelligence Surveillance, Thought Crimes “Violent Radicalization and Homegrown Terrorism Prevention Act, Warrantless Searches, Employee Verification Program, Body Imaging Screening, Patriot Act extension; and only NOW she is worried about free speech, privacy, and government take over of the internet. ” 

Stop by and drop off your 2 cents anytime, Mickey.

BTC – Thanks to Freedom’s Phoenix.

 http://kdvr.vid.trb.com/player/PaperVideoTest.swf

SEE ALSO: Rasmussen Poll shows 60%Reject Government ID for Online Security [NSTIC]

Digital ID News: The US isn’t ready for NSTIC & It’s all in the implementation

REAL ID UPDATE: Border states Texas, New Mexico and other southwestern states are actively increasing public discourse on terms of immigration policy and whether or not federal legislation will perform or deliver terms of relief promised to put limits on undocumented migrants seeking work.  North Carolina seems to be reinforcing terms to reduce federal spending on Real ID; while a Youngstown, NC legislator seeks to move legislation prohibitive of federalizing local drivers licenses.  A Real ID compliant discourse is stirring Nevada two years after the state passed a local resolution requesting that the federal law be repealed.   States are expected to be federally compliant with the law by May 11th, 2011.  More opinion here and here.

D.I.Y. Accountability: Send a message to Google and Facebook: Protect Our Privacy!

Here’s second life for news that matters:

US Bill Would Prohibit Internet ‘kill Switch’

Decentralizing the Internet So Big Brother Can’t Find You

FBI pushes for surveillance backdoors in Web 2.0 tools

Patriot Act Extension Lands on Obama’s Desk

SENDING OUT AN S.O.S….Clinton delivers speech to support nonviolent dissent on the web, as Ray McGovern arrested, brutalized. Analysis of the content of Clinton’s speech here.

DISCUSSION: The Internet and Social Media: Tools of Freedom or Tools of Oppression?

TSA agents admit to stealing $160,000 from bags at JFK Airport

HBGary -Anonymous- WIKILEAKS : @arstechnica @ggreenwald

WHAT DO YOU THINK?  Do-Not-Track bill facing criticism 
Add comments! RE: DoNotTrack

Essay anthology gives context on the use, history of national identity conventions

BTC – The public is the constant witness of electronic data streaming 24/7 on the Internet. The next line of temptation for governments is to initiate power plays with cyber information and attempt to organize it into a convenient remote controlled system of rulership over the inidividual.

It may be that our base, human ethical ecology doesn’t have the bandwidth to assume such responsibility without successive, spontaneous revolutions happening. Social networking technology and the Internet are speeding up the natural process of a nation’s people dumping bad government and taking their power back. If we were to pen a verse text respecting sacred Internet cows and their boundaries, it might read like,

And ye shall know your despots by the manner they handle Internet users and their personal information.

A Wikileaks cable uncovered the role of Egyptian dictator Mosni Mubarak’s role in allowing harbor for illegal torture of US rendered prisoners.  The last straw snapped for Egyptians when Mubarak interrupted mobile communications and the Internet. Mubarak opting for an aggressive Internet kill switch is more than simply grounding Egyptians without electronic amenity. His actions now define despotism to the generations.  The net was the last bastion for Egyptian freedom of speech. Civil unrest simply errupted from the cold space of the web directly onto the hot streets of Cairo. After that, the revolution was live in real time and the web caught up later.

Egyptians have endured 30 years of dictatorship rule and a normalized “state of emergency” status to control the people. Egyptian youth lately were seen flippantly displaying their national IDs and passports to televised media, demonstrating dissent, and bonafide evidence of an oppressive totalitarian government.

National Identification Systems: Essays in Oppositon, a heavily sourced 2004 essay anthology, has been astonishingly precognitive of the times we now live in. The text gives first gives historical context of what national identity articles have been used for and then delves into its current applications and the projected effects in public affairs. It would be a profoundly effective text for professors and adjuncts to use in curriculum about why and how national identity is used to capture and restrict power of the individual.

Here’s an example of how the book illuminates current events. The National Strategy for Trusted Identities in Cyberspace (NSTIC), a national digital authentication initiative, is moving ahead with hires for a national program office.  One essayist, Sunni Maravillosa, explores national identity authentication in society in the chapter titled, “National ID without Big Brother”.  After reading this, one might gather the purpose of the national program office is to provide government oversight or regulation to an existing organic national identity system designed for business.

Other important topics include the prospective use of nanotechnologies, microchips, biometric devices, computers and efforts to centralize digital data; which leads back to the identified person.

The anthology’s expository tour of government methods, history and social context is a comprehensive critical view of national identity systems in government. It is recommended reading for any identified person seeking the long view.

National Identification Systems: Essays in Opposition is available through McFarland publishing. [800-253-2187]

Remind anyone of the Real ID Act?

ALSO AVAILABLE from  McFarland
American Zombie Gothic, The Rise and Fall (and Rise) of the Walking Dead in Popular Culture

Government bodies see “revolting” citizens

BTC –  Facebook, MeetUp and other online groups have proven their worth as a tool for activists and organizers. While some may doubt their tweets, e-mail and calls-to-action online may have little effect on government, you should watch the following video titled, The State of the Social Net: A Catalyst for Civil and Political Revolt

Here’s a really balanced article higlighting the fears and concerns of government in the age of Social Networking by Clay Shirky.  It’s not a fix-it article but it’s intention is to keep government from flipping over their own boats.

The Political Power of Social Media
Technology, the Public Sphere, and Political Change  

c/o InternetCaucusAC

http://www.youtube.com/p/DAFF84EB7B99AE87?hl=en_US&fs=1

VIEW ALL VIDEO HERE

The 7th annual State of the Net conference was held at the Hyatt Regency Washington on Capitol Hill on January 18-19, 2011. Attracting over 500 attendees annually, the State of the Net Conference provides unparalleled opportunities to network and engage on key policy issues. The State of the Net Conference is the largest information technology policy conference in the U.S. and the only one with over 50 percent Congressional staff and government policymakers in attendance. The State of the Net Conference is the only tech policy conference routinely recognized for its balanced blend of academics, consumer groups, industry and government. Over 50% of annual attendees government policy staff.