Archive for the ‘NSA’ Category

The aim of an Orwellian psych-out only serves HAL

ZILLAMOD — I picked up an interesting anthology of essays, What Orwell Didn’t Know, Propaganda and the New Face of American Politics. The assertions are consistent with the time it was written for and even more so now. It carefully dissects the deliberate manipulation of language in media. This lead to Orwell’s assertion that in totaliarian governance public view of truths are To-Be-Determined by those in power.

Bring a life preserver. HAL isn’t going to provide for anything outside of your dependence on the system.

Hubris and censorship are not new under the sun. Nor are autocrats, authoritarians or those who want to deal unjustly to turn down objective of law for personal and collective benefit.  It always helps to know you are not the first person in human history to deal with government machinery; which oversells adoption of authority and then doesn’t care for the fate of those in its mandate.

Why should it?  It is a system. Systems don’t have feelings, empathy or any human parts.  That is why it would make perfect sense to get someone who has none of these traits to manage it from a purely technical sense. In practice, human systems of government and would-be governance ply programmable human parts, meat to run like machines.  Machines need troubleshooting.  When they don’t work anymore they are labeled “junk” and are thrown out.

Businesses and governments tend to recruit people who objectively obey all commands and produce robotically on-demand. Through breeding and psycho-social conditioning western society has produced a culture where at least 1/3 of the residents are going to obey commands entered into their respective CPU’s, without reasoning in their self-interest.

As you try to run most human beings like they are machines there is a fundamental conflict: feelings, empathy, health impacts and most importantly, a will. Human beings are not technologies to be slaved. This is one great fundamental conflict with fantastic amounts of story.  It is a well that all types of writers will draw from again and again to illustrate our present human experience. They know it is a system that is not working for human interest.

The quest to objectify all of humanity works just fine for the system itself. It is a winning solution for the machines who, like HAL from the film 2010, will preemptively shut down the life support of sleeping innocents for being in the wrong place, at the wrong time to retain its function and position. The mistake was whoever designed HAL, required human life to be overdependent on its sympathetic functions.  We learned HAL was a stupid machine with too much power and blunted sense of mission.  It was a machine that killed those in its care to retain its respective position as a malfunctioning robot.

THE DEBATE: FIX OR SCRAP HAL

HAL is a robot.  There is no “justice” for robots, only scrap heaps.  You might be able to fix HAL’s programming. However, human beings with a strong sense of self-preservation will never trust or allow HAL to manage sympathetic functions from a dependent position ever again.

The irony would be human beings who have traded in their humanity for mechanized or systemic parts suffering a sudden recollection of their humanity and their will.  This reanimation comes tragically upon stark realisation they are creating great harm to others in their care.  This usually is paired with a train of institutionalised human dependents weighing heavily on the system: invalids, prisoners, orphans, the seriously mentally ill, and the military.  The system needs these as reason for being. It will create and sustain conditions to fuel its reason for being regardless of how well it performs for society.

Do I need prisoners, orphans, invalids, mental patients or the military to survive?  No.  However, the system needs them to be relevant.  One solution would be to take the systemic dependents away from the malfunctioning system so it loses power and will submit to a technical fix. That is exactly what Republican interests keep trying to do. Then someone would have to adopt the burden of institutionalised dependents.  You can take the dependents out of the institution, but can you take the institution out of the dependents?

Whoever wants a technical policy fix needs to deal with the co-morbid problem of the unhealed or those with involuntary dependance on State systems.  Some of the prisoners can be freed by changing ludicrous laws.  Some of the mentally ill can be helped with compassionate reasoned care.  Some of the invalid will recover.  Some orphans will be adopted to competent caring homes. Let’s say up to 1/3 of these people groups will not.  Their interests are inherently tied to the existence of anyone who will provide for them unconditionally until their confines perish. This kicks back to reason for keeping HAL’s lights on. In the meantime, HAL is still malfunctioning, maiming and killing those in its care and seeking to create more dependents to sustain itself.

It now dawns on us the express technical fix is not sufficient alone to service a system managing human populations.  A working system will balance the technical fix with the interests of independent reasoning human beings using common intelligence and empathy.  You must allow The Public a manual override of operations to maintain the system when it is fundamentally at fault.  Such is the case with the NSA and general welfare agencies administered by the Executive branch.  The Constitution provides for such an override in the emergence of comprehensively rogue government.  However, HAL’s intent is to override the override. Quandries.

The system will still be a system, but someone with some higher intellect will need sense enough to produce a timely remedy vs. to preserve the faulty system for the sake of having a system.  The latter principle is ludicrous. It is failing the world.

If you allow for the human override there will be some shedding of bureaucratic weight, military attrition and prison releases. There will also be a rebalance of power so poorly functioning parts, departments or rulers will be replaced to restore the interests of the general public not the system itself.

You can tell The People the machine is broken all day long.  To trust a broken machine that kills and maims the public interest as a staple is a bad idea. It will get 1/3 of the vote in the west for being the prevailing state authority.  The rest of the public won’t believe or accept that as a fix.

IN CANDIDE’S BOAT

You will realise there are so many socially accepted remedies for common problems which defeat the public interest. In Egypt and Macedonia, women eroded their faces with radioactive make-up in efforts to look beautiful.  In the dark ages, people threw their defecations out of the window to later to walk through them on the way to the marketplace, curtailing lifespans. Today, millions of people are walking around with dental fillings containing 50% mercury. Mercury is a neurotoxic element that is medically admissible in dental practice.  In the future it will be something else.

In every one of these cases, people were led to believe prevailing social customs were safe and acceptable.  To challenge them was considered inconvenient or frowned upon.  To challenge the prevailing wisdom of a dysfunctional power with an authentic fix will be viewed by many as actually immoral and perverse.  However, if you are wiser than just 1/3 of the western public, your gift of conventional wisdom is meant to prevail and improve the human condition.

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c/o MontrealGazette

“Thanks to new laws and technologies, authorities track and eavesdrop on Americans as they never could before, hauling in billions of bank records, travel receipts and other information. In several cases, they have wiretapped conversations between lawyers and defendants, challenging the long-established legal principle that attorney-client communication is inviolate.”

:::MORE HERE:::

Here is second life for news that matters. 

BTC – What is a national identification number (NIN)?  Why would it be useful or what purpose would it serve? Who gets a number?  How would it affect public life?

Enumerated identity and its uses are typically to manage populaces en masse.

From Wikipedia:

A national identification number or National Identity Card number is used by the governments of many countries as a means of tracking their citizenspermanent residents, and temporary residents for the purposes of work, taxation, government benefitshealth care, and other governmentally-related functions. Sometimes, the number will appear on an identity card issued by a country.

The ways in which such a system is implemented is dependent on the country, but in most cases, a citizen is issued a number at birth or when they reach a legal age (typically the age of 18). Non-citizens are issued such numbers when they enter the country.

Many countries issued such numbers ostensibly for a singular purpose, but over time, they become a de facto national identification number. For example, the United States originally developed its Social Security Number system as a means of disbursing Social Security benefits. However, due to functionality creep, the number has become utilized for other purposes to the point where it is almost essential to have one in order to, among other things, open a bank account, obtain acredit card, or drive a car.  

As technology advances there are always more systems to categorize persons based on wants, needs, likes, and dislikes.  Information is useful for many objectives; but in the context of power it can be abused.  Information (or intelligence) abuses may range from common blackmail to surveillance abuse.  Information about an individual can be conveniently reduced to an enumerated identity. This gives data value and longevity because it may prove something about us. However, it may be private information or information we do not want known at large.

The White House is giving the American public roughly 3 weeks to examine the National Strategy for Trusted Identity in Cyberspace or NSTIC, an new system which would produce a number for every American online user.  The American public bears the burden of what happens to their identity property online.  For example, if you are checking on a malady from Bora Bora, Big Government Computers could feasibly track or capture that information and trace it back to you.  Why would they even care?

Well… it’s not personal at first.  As we have discovered over the last several years, providing surveillance technology services is an enormous corporate industry between the public and private sectors.   There is an economic incentive to track us. Businesses will pay for analysis of who you are and why you will or won’t buy their stuff.  Government intelligence agencies hire contractors who can get the same information for their purposes. Google has made a killing from selling search generated information which has the ability to identify any user straight down to their IP addresses.  

We have to be careful with programs like NSTIC.  Other programs like Real ID, the PASS Act and the proposed BELIEVE worker cards have been recognized as nefarious by the American public.  The notion of a deeper, more prolific, voluntary induction into a national identity system via the operability of a social network (akin to joining up with Facebook) might be uneasy prospect for citizens.  With current odds stacked up against privacy and civil liberty,  I can’t say with much confidence the US government is a friend worth adding to an individual social network.  
If Federal powers want to: table the more rediculous Executive Orders, stop using the NSA States Secrets line of rhetoric to hide all the dead bodies, dump the FISA warrantless wiretapping entitlements, remove the TSA naked body scanners from airports, repeal existing compromising national identity systems creeping up annually, stop suppressing journalists and arresting whistleblowers THEN citizens might naturally develop more confidence.  
This track record does not inspire trust in validating an ask for pervasive friendship from those who know better.
The point is to examine NSTIC with both eyes open for what it actually is, could be and may be in the future because it has possibilities with a price.  This may be your only chance to opt out of automatic subscription to an online service.  

BTC – This is a montage of the comprehensive battle for your private information and the use of integrated technologies to sift and evaluate your data.  Pretty chilling stuff.

Voice recognition, world wiretapping & data nexusses

c/o Glenn Greenwald, Salon.com


“UPDATE: Dan Froomkin echoes, and elaborates on, several of the points here, in his Huffington Post piece entitled: “Ruling Against Bush Wiretaps Also Slaps Down Obama’s Executive Overreach.” He writes: “the ruling should serve as a wake-up call to those who thought that the days of executive overreach were behind us.”

And Charlie Savage and Jim Risen have a new NYT article which, in the course of discussing whether the Obama DOJ will appeal this decision, examine the likely motives and goals of the Obama administration here, none of which reflect well on them at all.”

:::ENTIRE ARTICLE HERE:::

BTC – Fox guarding henhouse? Sure thing. The corporations’ idea of regarding privacy looks and sounds like this.

c/o ABA Journal

As malicious cyber attacks apparently are occurring more frequently and with more sophistication than ever before, a search engine giant has turned to a United States spy agency for help in dealing with a major suspected China-based hacking effort in December.

But the move by Google Inc. to work with the National Security Agency to address the claimed intrusion into its computer network–as well as those of some 30 other companies–has raised concerns about unwanted government knowledge of individual users’ personal information, according to the New York Times.

“Google and NSA are entering into a secret agreement that could impact the privacy of millions of users of Google’s products and services around the world,” says executive director Marc Rotenberg of the Electronic Privacy Information Center. His Washington-based policy group sued the NSA today, seeking information about the agency’s role in cybersecurity-related surveillance.

The pact between Google and NSA was earlier reported by the Washington Post. The Post says the agreement, which is still being negotiated, calls for the NSA to help analyze what happened with the goal of successfully defending against future cyber attacks.

Senior counsel Greg Nojeim of the Center for Democracy & Technology tells the Post there is statutory authority for companies to share information with the United States government in order to protect their property rights.

According to the Times, the cooperative research and development agreement between Google and the NSA is authorized by the Federal Technology Transfer Act of 1986. It permits the government to enter into a written agreement to work with a private company on a specific project intended to promote the commercialization of government-developed technology.

BTC – As Americans we are prone to getting dizzy, lost, in what I have deemed “the toilet of distractions”. Today news crows are invested with the incests of D.C.’s culture of deceit and secrecy. Paying attention is almost not worth it if you watch TV or read conventional news.

It is important to have some education on the nature of the work in American intelligence agencies.

The two following films shed essential light on the real problems with some of the intelligence processes. They will help anyone understand surveillance, national security, secrecy and the way our Congress has become drafted or seduced into an “in” club.

The “closed door” briefings that the CIA and other intelligence agencies regularly commence with, force secrecy on our top officials. Some of whom may actually NEED to speak up on behalf of their constituencies or even possibly self preservation.

Whatever your opinion is of the nature of modern conspiracy; secrecy seems to be consistent with abuses of power.

Below are 2 films to examine what the US government has done on the auspices of “national security”.

[Great big thanks to friends Frank Dorrell and Kimberly Johnson]


What I’ve Learned About U.S. Foreign Policy

http://video.google.com/googleplayer.swf?docid=-6171375275571061709&hl=en&fs=true

ALSO WATCH: Secrets of the CIA

Five courageous former CIA agents reveal deep secrets of the CIA (45 min)

http://personalgrowthcourses.net/video/secrets_cia