Archive for the ‘scanners’ Category

MEDIA ADVISORY 

For Immediate Release
SF Entertainment Commission New Surveillance Rules to Impact Privacy, Venues


WHO:  Anyone with professional and recreational pursuits concerning entertainment in the City of San Francisco, Calif. 
WHAT:   Public input and review of rules containing increased police and surveillance forces at entertainment venues in San Francisco 
WHEN: Tuesday, April 12th  6:00 PM 
WHERE: San Francisco -City Hall: RM 400, 1 Dr.  Carlton B. Goodlett Place 
WHY:  It impacts business, tourism and San Francisco’s culture. 
HOW:  Show up to City Hall, sign up and be prepared to give input  about the how your information would be handled by local venues and the police.
For comments and information: 
Deborah Pierce for Privacy Activism 

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TECH LIBERATION FRONT 
San Francisco’s Entertainment Commission will soon be considering a jaw-dropping attack on privacy and free assembly. Here are some of the rules the Commission may adopt for any gathering of people expected to reach 100 or more:
“3. All occupants of the premises shall be ID Scanned (including patrons, promoters, and performers, etc.). ID scanning data shall be maintained on a data storage system for no less than 15 days and shall be made available to local law enforcement upon request. 

4. High visibility cameras shall be located at each entrance and exit point of the premises. Said cameras shall maintain a recorded data base for no less than fifteen (15 days) and made available to local law enforcement upon request.”

WP>> (Utah) Deseret News >> NorthernIdahoWebDesigns

WASHINGTON — Since the attempted bombing of a U.S. airliner on Christmas Day, former Homeland Security Secretary Michael Chertoff has given dozens of media interviews touting the need for the federal government to buy more full-body scanners for airports.
What he has made little mention of is that the Chertoff Group, his security consulting agency, includes a client that manufactures the machines. Chertoff disclosed the relationship on a CNN program Wednesday, in response to a question.
An airport passengers’ rights group on Thursday criticized Chertoff’s use of his former government credentials to advocate for a product that benefits his clients.

“Mr. Chertoff should not be allowed to abuse the trust the public has placed in him as a former public servant to privately gain from the sale of full-body scanners under the pretense that the scanners would have detected this particular type of explosive,” said Kate Hanni, founder of FlyersRights.org, which opposes the use of the scanners.

Chertoff’s advocacy for the technology dates back to his time in the Bush administration In 2005, Homeland Security ordered the government’s first batch of the scanners — five from California- based Rapiscan Systems.

Rapiscan is one of only two companies that make full-body scanners in accordance with current contract specifications required by the federal government.
Currently, 40 body scanners are in use among 19 U.S. airports. The number is expected to skyrocket, at least in part because of the Christmas Day incident. The Transportation Security Administration has said it will order another 300 machines.
In the summer, TSA purchased another 150 machines from Rapiscan with $25 million in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funds.