Archive for the ‘surveillance state’ Category

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BTC – IBM is that nasty guy at the Info Bar who slips something into your beverage while you are distracted and then takes full advantage before you come to.  Guys like that believe, inherently, you want your non-consensual compromise as badly as they do.

“It [BIG DATA] will change our existing notions of privacy. A surveillance society is not only inevitable, it’s worse. It’s irresistible,” said Jeff Jonas, a distinguished engineer with IBM. Jonas spoke to a packed house of several hundred people Wednesday at the Structure Big Data 2011 conference here.

:::MORE HERE:::

How predictable!  IBM, Verichip wundersponsor, can’t help but love systemic numerical processing of people’s information for cash!  Ahem … excepting the deep privacy argument that information surveillance doesn’t really happen- or even start- with bonafide informed consent, simply distracted consent.  Between TIME’s coverage of the great data heist of 2011 and the Wall Street Journal’s “What They Know” columns; Washington has been successfully cornered on the massive problem of unaccountable data brokerages and the information surveillance of millions of people.

Let’s not forget what we are up against; an entire unchecked industry who -for lack of limits- has grown not only entitled, by years of unchecked precedent, but also super-rich.   A simple protest in NYC is not fixing this…

Here is second life for news that matters.

WHAT THEY KNOW @alleyinsider: Color isn’t about photo sharing. It’s about data mining. Founder Bill Nguyen explains. http://read.bi/f3WU6k

Browser Beware: Washington Weighs Online Consumer Privacy

Data Mining: How Companies Now Know Everything About You

Big Data to revolutionize Healthcare according to ONC 

Europe and U.S. converging on Internet privacy

Are 95% of People Investigated Under New FBI Guidelines Innocent, but Entered into Database?

BTC-  While there are many who express disgust with the public transit system, I feel it’s something I can live with until an electric car is ready.  In recent past I’ve discovered public transit is partial to public surveillance theatre and special pre-recorded reminders about watching for suspicious packages.

However, nothing topped the TransitWatch pamphlet I picked up today, complete with the “watchful eye” logo on it.  Blame my hypervigilance on the emergent ghosts of Kafka or today’s quest to afflict John Yoo… but all of it was so telling that I was in the right vein of conscientious objection when I saw the following text inside the transit lit.

Be on the alert for suspicious… behavior: 

[Please keep in mind it’s Summer in the Bay Area both hot and cold apply.]

If you spot any suspicious individuals engaged in  questionable activity, look for the following:

  • Visible signs of nervousness [What does one man’s nervousness look like to another?

  • Excessive sweating [How much sweat is too much sweat?

  • Sprayer bottles or aerosol canisters [I can’t mist myself down on a hot day?]

  • Inappropriate clothing that is excessively baggy or too heavy in warm weather  [What is “inappropriate” or too “baggy”? Tell that to the ghettotechnicians getting on BART in Oakland!]

Recommended course of action:

Do not confront suspicious individuals.

Contact a transit employee or the police immediately.

***

None of these descriptions have anything to do with an actual crime being committed, but if your neighbor doesn’t like your clothes or the fact that you broke a sweat trying to make the train on time – you might be soon be a terror watch subject.

This message was brought to you in part by a system that has been in place since 2003, based on a UK public surveillance policy of “reasonable indication” and these fine folks.

Here’s second life for news that matters:

Secret surveillance camera approved by Texas appellate court 

Voluntary activist arrested 

First biometric ATM goes live in Poland

Serious privacy concerns over vehicle monitoring systems

Lifelock is running infomercials or just really long ads on TV. The LifeLock CEO’s identity stolen 13 times in the past.

In case you forgot what DHS had to say about the Real ID Act…

UK police backing down over surveillance cams

ACLU: America is being riddled with politically motivated surveillance

WHOIS Evan Ratliff?



THIS WEEK ON WAKING UP ORWELL 
On the lamm with WIRED’s Evan Ratliff


AUDIO::: TAX RELIEF SPECIAL: The Story of evading a WIRED identity 


BTC – For Tax Day only, we are switching from our regular formatted programming to bring you a special talk with Evan Ratliff, a co-editor for WIRED Magazine who created an assignment to disappear with strategic aims to not be found. WIRED’s sponsored contest had escalating tiers of money for the digital bounty hunter who could track down and catch Ratliff in his remote locations. 


Evan was in and out of disguises for the duration of his extended assignment. He toured with a band, became a semi-granola hippie and even adopted a disguise as balding stereotype in a suit to evade getting “caught” for prize money. He shares a very unique story of how he did his best to evade being actively identified by those who tracked him down with arcane and creative digital clues. Relax, as much as you can, in this moderately paranoid yet entertaining tale of public evasion. 


ABOUT EVAN RATLIFF

Ratliff is a freelance journalist whose writing appears in Wired magazine, The New Yorker, the New York Times Sunday Magazine, Outside, Discover, Men’s Journal, New York, and many other publications. A contributing editor for Wired, he is the co-author of Safe: The Race to Protect Ourselves in a Newly Dangerous World (HarperCollins, 2005), about innovation and counterterrorism. A former fellow at both the International Reporting Project and the Japan Foreign Press Center, he has reported from Russia, Cameroon, Bangladesh, Brazil, and elsewhere on science and technology, the environment, terrorism, politics, and transnational crime.



IN OTHER NEWS: 


Senators Raise Privacy Concerns About Body Scanner Technology 
c/o EPIC

Three United States Senators have written a letter to Secretary Napolitano of the Department of Homeland Security, urging the Department to reconsider the whole body scanners currently planned for U.S. airports. Senators Collins (R-ME), Kyl (R-AZ), and Chambliss (R-GA) encouraged Secretary Napolitano to consider “auto-detection” devices instead of human screeners to address privacy concerns. The Senators noted that the current technology allows airport officials to “view detailed images of passengers’ bodies” and also that other systems could “save the government and airports money on physical space for screening.” 

Restrictive Immigration Policies Confound Security 
c/o Cato FLOGGER Jim Harper


Shuttering GITMO, not this week but “as quickly as we can” says AG Holder


Senator Leahy seems to be pushing for more Patriot Act oversights


TRACKING WINOS: Winemakers pitched on RFID to ward off “fraudulent wines”


Wikileaks Collateral Murder video – if you haevn’t seen it yet.


A speed camera causes an accident


PARAMILITARY BACON ALERT … according to microblogger Tracy Ward, the Kansas City Police Department is seeking to stock up parts of the city with ShotSpotter misery.

“KCPD and Councilwoman Cathy Jolly are seeking federal taxpayer money ($2 million) to turn Emanuel Cleaver’s porkulus project “KC Green Impact Zone” into something that more closely resembles the Baghdad “Green Zone” with a new surveillance system from ShotSpotter.”  Hearsay?  We’ll be looking for the details in the days to come.  


BTC – This is a montage of the comprehensive battle for your private information and the use of integrated technologies to sift and evaluate your data.  Pretty chilling stuff.

Voice recognition, world wiretapping & data nexusses

BTC – Our weekly online radio digest, Waking Up Orwell (WUO) has overcome many mishaps to reach the remote location it is at today. What no one really realized was how many hits we were actually getting on podOmatic.


WUO success rates online via podomatic have completely dwarfed most of our previous online listenerships put together. We looked at lots of radio channels, but it seems that we have found our yodeling point on the mountain of listeners we get on podOmatic.