Archive for the ‘Real ID deadline’ Category

One question that neither the backers of Real ID nor of Pass ID have adequately answered is: If this law were in place before 9/11, would it have prevented the attacks? Given that terrorists would still be able to steal or forge identity documents, or even obtain them legally as many of the 9/11 hijackers did, the answer is almost certainly no. 

Tracking identity is a poor way to fend off terrorists; a better approach would be stronger measures to prevent them from smuggling weapons or explosives onto airplanes. Rather than trying to save Real ID with a less destructive bill, better to let it die of its fatal flaws. – LA Times

REAL ID REAL PAIN

Legislation to create a federal ID card is an expensive, intrusive boondoggle that should be killed.

If you’re planning on using up those frequent-flier miles, you might want to make the trip before the end of the year. Unless Congress or the Obama administration takes action on a shortsighted national security law approved in response to the 9/11 attacks, the nation’s air travel system will get turbulent on Jan. 1, 2010.

With no debate, the Senate in 2005 approved the Real ID Act: H.R. 418: — which had been inserted into must-pass legislation authorizing funds for the Iraq war. That may have been the only way to get the deeply controversial law through the upper house, because of all the heightened security measures passed following 9/11, none will have as dramatic and intrusive an effect on the lives of everyday Americans as Real ID.

The law mandates a tamper-proof card that would become the only acceptable form of identification for federal purposes, such as boarding a commercial airliner or entering a federal building. It was clumsily drafted in a way that imposes multibillion-dollar expenses on state governments, enhances opportunities for identity theft, turns state motor vehicle departments into arms of U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement and will almost certainly lead to harassment of immigrants, legal or otherwise. Though legislation has recently been introduced in Congress that would repair many of Real ID’s faults, it doesn’t go far enough. The best way to fix Real ID is to repeal it.

Real ID was a response to the recommendations of the 9/11 Commission, which called for federal standards for driver’s licenses and birth certificates. That’s because 18 of the 19 hijackers had state IDs, some of which were fraudulent and some of which should have expired because the terrorists had overstayed their visas.

PASS ID

Pass ID is an improvement, but it still imposes risks and burdens that outweigh its national security benefits. It mandates storage of identity documents by state officials and immigration checks at the DMV. It complicates efforts by some states to issue driver’s licenses to illegal immigrants, because such licenses would require special markings to signal that the bearer is here illegally. We don’t oppose sensible measures to enforce our immigration laws, but anything that discourages undocumented immigrants from getting driver’s licenses — as Pass ID would — endangers all drivers on the road and raises insurance costs for everyone.

:::MORE HERE:::

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Utah may defy feds on REAL ID

The state of Utah would thumb its nose at federal requirements of the 2005 REAL ID Act under provisions of a bill that passed the House on Thursday.

The mandate of the U.S. Congress, crafted by the Department of Homeland Security, calls for states to come into an initial level of compliance, including specialized photography to aid facial recognition software and the establishment of an accessible database, by 2010, with further requisites to follow.

Under provisions of HB64, sponsored by Rep. Stephen Sandstrom, R-Orem, the Utah Driver’s License Division would be prohibited from implementing the requirements of REAL ID — a move Sandstrom said many states have already made.

“Utah … would be joining 21 states that have done the same thing,” Sandstrom said. “This really is the framework for all kinds of government intrusion in our life.”

Rep. Bradley Daw, R-Orem, testifying in support of the bill told the body that complying with REAL ID was not a simple, or inexpensive, task.

“It is not a minor change to the driver’s license,” Daw said. “The quote is anywhere from $20-80 million … we should be able to manage our driver’s licenses the way we see fit.”

THIS ARTICLE IS DEDICATED TO ALL THE HARDWORKING ANTI-REAL ID ACTIVISTS BUSTING THEIR ASSES TRYING TO KEEP FASCISM FROM STEALING THE AMERICAN IDENTITY.  YOU KNOW WHO YOU ARE .  IN CASE YOU STILL LIVE IN A STATE WHO HASN’T REJECTED THEIR REAL ID, BeatTheChip IS HERE TO TELL YOU THAT YOUR STATE IS STILL FACING AN UNFUNDED MANDATE.  DON’T YOU DARE THINK YOU CAN GO BACK TO SLEEP ABOUT THIS.

Here’s to REASON, who didn’t use enough of it, and maybe failed to realize that SB60 was just upon them in their Los Angeles backyards and that California is barely out of the woods as a State on this issue.
WITHOUT FURTHER ADO:

HEAD TO HEAD: South Carolina Braces Against Real ID 3-31-08
BeatTheChip.org w/ special thanks to Eric Ward of Columbia’s Free Times

COLUMBIA, SC – The South Carolina governor’s office released a five page letter with rationale for not filing a Real ID extension to the Department of Homeland Securities by today’s deadline.

“At the end of the day, I’m duty-bound to uphold the laws of our state, which right now say we can’t comply with Real ID,” Gov. Sanford said.

“That being said, I do fall into the camp that believes Real ID is poor public policy for any number of reasons, and we have some real questions as to whether the benefits in terms of security outweigh the costs in terms of time and money. We think the state legislature did the right thing last year when it said no to Real ID, and I’m going to keep working with Homeland Security and with other governors to keep this law from negatively impacting our state.”

Those following Real ID have eagerly awaited a response from the South Carolina governor’s office, as one of the last states holding out to file an extension deadline to implement Real ID. In a statement released this morning, the South Carolina governor asked that their state’s constituents not be treated any differently from states who have laws that prevent Real ID from being implemented, like Alaska and New Hampshire.